Jason Grigsby

Co-founder

In 2000, Jason Grigsby got his first mobile phone. He became obsessed with how the world could be a better place if everyone had access to the world’s information in their pockets. When his soon-to-be-wife met him, he had covered the walls of his apartment with crazy mobile dreams. To this day, he remains baffled that she married him.

Those mobile dreams hit the hard wall of reality: WAP was crap. So Jason went to work on the web until 2007, when the iPhone made it clear the time was right. He joined forces with the three smartest people he knew and started Cloud Four.

He is the author of Progressive Web Apps from A Book Apart and co-author of Head First Mobile Web from O'Reilly. His writing and work helped define the new web standards for responsive images.

He was the founder and president of Mobile Portland, a local nonprofit dedicated to promoting the mobile community where he started the first community device lab. There are now over 150 device labs in the world.

Since co-founding Cloud Four, he has had the good fortune to work on many fantastic projects, including the Obama iPhone App and Walmart's responsive design. Jason is a sought‐after speaker and consultant on web technology and mobile.

Latest Articles

The Design System Priority of Constituencies

Of all the things that the W3C has published, my favorite is the priority of constituencies. That’s quite a statement given the W3C published the standards that form the foundation of the web and, by extension, my career. But the…

A Bashful Button Worth $8 Million

My father-in-law loves the Olive Garden. So of course that's what we offered to bring for our first post-vaccination meal. I grabbed my iPad and passed it around to build an order. Everything went smoothly until I tried to checkout.

Faster Integration with Web Components

Web components promise speedier integration. At some level, I understood this. I've even made this exact point while advocating for them. And yet, what happened on a recent project surprised me.

An HTML attribute potentially worth $4.4M to Chipotle

I recently found myself racing to fill out Chipotle’s online order form before my mother could find her credit card. In the process, I discovered a bug that could cost Chipotle $4.4 million annually. My parents are retired. They continue…

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