Dare to Repeat Yourself (At First)

Written by Tyler Sticka on

It was mid-afternoon on a Wednesday when my team started finding strange bugs in older versions of Internet Explorer. At first these appeared to be unrelated… until we noticed seemingly random chunks of style appeared to be missing entirely. What was going on?

After some digging, we found the issue: Our project had exceeded old IE’s infamous CSS selector limit. Weeks prior, I’d lost an argument to resist including a sizable framework in the project. Mentally, I was already patting myself on the back. “I told you so,” I practiced saying in my own head.

Then I looked at the compiled CSS, and realized it was actually my fault.


I’d designed a custom interface element that was pretty complex. Because we were using Sass, I used some fancy mixins and loops to avoid repetition between a handful of breakpoint-specific modifiers. It was easy to read, maintain and modify.

It was so easy, in fact, that I failed to notice that the compiled CSS made up about 25% of the total project’s styles! Even more embarrassingly, I discovered that I could replicate the exact same functionality without most of the loops. I ended up reducing the selector count for that component from 1,207 to just 42 (seriously).

While it was great to find and fix the problem, it shook me up a little. Sass didn’t write crap code; I did. I was so focused on automating my repetitive solution that I hadn’t stopped to ask myself if it was even the right solution.

We recently started using PostCSS for a few of our projects. Every PostCSS feature is a plugin, which we include as needed. So far, we’ve yet to include plugins for nesting, mixins or loops.

Every time we’ve thought to include those features, we’ve instead found a simpler way to do the same thing. Nesting gives way to descendent class names, mixins become utilities, loops are questioned entirely. The initial pain of having to repeat ourselves motivates us to approach the problem in a different way. Repetitive selectors that survive this process are intentional, because a human being actually wrote them.

I know that’s probably silly. It’s definitely not DRY. But there’s a fine line between “smarter stylesheets” and “dumber designer.” Embracing painful repetition by nerfing my preprocessor (especially in combination with analysis tools like Parker) helps me draw that line.

Tyler Sticka

Tyler Sticka is Cloud Four’s Lead Designer, allowing him to think about responsive and component-based design almost every day. When he isn’t sketching on sticky notes, experimenting with SVG or nitpicking design details with his coworkers, he enjoys reading comics, making video games and listening to weird music. He tweets as @tylersticka.

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